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On1 2021 Playing with Layered Images

On1 2021 Playing with Layered Images

I don’t much play with image layers because I find the process a little tedious and time consuming. However, when you’re bored and looking for something to do, why not have a go, it’s all a learning experience after all.

That being said, what this article does not attempt to do is to tell you how to do every fiddly editing task required. What is does do though is cover is the basic process in enough detail so that you have all the information you need to go do it yourself. With these points in mind, let’s get started.

The first thing you are going to need is a bunch of photos. The image above is made up of 4 images taken hand held using a Fuji x-T1 on burst mode. I actually managed to capture around 10 images but layering up all 10 would have made the final image look cluttered and overly busy. I therefore chose just 4 that would give me the feeling of movement that I wanted and that wouldn’t take the rest of my life to process.

Once you have your selected images, you need to create a layered image. To do this simply highlight all of the images you wish to include in your composite – you can do this in BROWSE by pressing Cntrl + Left Mouse Button while hovering over each image (they will then have boxes around them) and then clicking on the Layers icon on the RHS of the screen. This opens a dialog box asking if you want to continue to create a stacked layer image – select OK. On1 takes a little time to do this but of course, this is hardware dependent. Once On1 has done its thing you’ll see a new image with say 4 layers (or as many images as you selected), each layer holding one of the 4 images selected. The bottom layer in the stack is going to be the base layer that contains all of the information in the photo ie the people, wall, background, everything. You are not really going to do anything to this layer unless you want to develop it or change the style. If you need to change the order of the images you can simply drag and drop them into their new locations. Bear in mind though that the lowest layer in the list is your base layer, everything else is composited onto that layer.

With regards pre-editing each image, personally I tend to leave any post-processing until the end of the process. I also tend to work on RAW so as to include as much information in the final image as possible.

When starting to work on a particular layer you need to isolate this. You do this by clicking on the small orange dot to the LHS of the small image in the layers panel that you want to turn off. When the layer is active, the dot is orange. When off, it’s grey. Once these are off, you are left with just the layer you want to work on.

The key tool to use now, and this is repeated for the other 2 layers, is the MASK tool on the LHS of the screen. Click on this and choose AI from the list of 3 icons top left of the editing screen. Make sure that MODE: KEEP is on and you are ready to start painting. With MODE: KEEP on, everything you paint over is in green. Now, you really don’t need to be ultra precise at this point so just run the brush (which you can change in size) top to bottom and left to right of the guy in the air. Then, with MODE:DROP enabled, run your pointer (it’s now turned to red) around the image pretty much as shown here to mark all of the parts you don’t want to keep. Now, I tend to use a drawing pad for this but you can just use your mouse if you don’t have one. Either way, here’s what it’s going to look like before you hit APPLY.

Once you hit apply, this is what you are going to see (hopefully). Basically the red areas are transparent which of course is exactly what you want for layering up a complex image.

The next step is to refine the edges of your green selection so that any parts you don’t want to include are dropped. For this operation you simple use the REFINE tool on the LHS making sure that you set MODE: DROP. There are several tool options but I use mostly the REFINE and CHISEL brushes as these clean up the image pretty well. You need to take your time but you can do a great job with care and patience. Here, I spent just a few minutes on the cleanup process but you can see that the end result looks pretty good.

That’s it for this image, you simply repeat this process for the other 2 layers and you’re ready to compile them into the final composite. You do this by turning all the layers ON (orange dot is showing) and then setting the OPACITY for each layer so that the layer below bleeds through. Because I wanted the effect of motion, I set the very top layer to about 20%, the next to 35% and the 3rd to 50% initially and then modified them slightly to get the effect I wanted. You can play with these faders as it’s all a matter of taste. Once you are happy with your composite, highlight the very top image and go to export. This will ensure that all 4 layers are exported to the final composite image. Here’s the resulting 4 image composite I ended up with.

You can of course stop here but I tend to like to stylise my images using Nik Efex so the very first image (header image) used Nik Silver Efex while the one shown below used Nik Alanog Efex. I hope that this has given you a few ideas for playing around with layers.

Some thoughts on ON1 Photo RAW 2021

Some thoughts on ON1 Photo RAW 2021

Although I use On1 routinely for most of my editing, I so far haven’t really mentioned it to any great degreeon this blog, even though most of the images you see here will have been processed using On1. I’m therefore going to take this opportunity to put this right today.

This hugely competent editor from OnOne is a full featured editor available for both Windows and MAC. It combines comprehensive RAW editing with the ability to use a huge number of Presets and LUT’s with a fully integrated layer management system. It also includes a very usable Digital Asset Management system (DAM) for those that want to apply keywords and descriptions to their images and to manage image locations, albums and virtual copies etc. This now includes the ability to find and delete duplicates as well as group your images more efficiently. Albums are hugely useful in that they help you to group images across multiple directories. For example you could create an album called Reflections and include any image within that album that includes a reflection of some kind irrespective of in which directory that image is sitting. Albums can be any size so no limit to the number of images you can add. I use them extensively.

ON1 offers a single user interface and recent improvements include the ability to work on and improve your portraits without having to leave ON1 to go to something like PortraitPro. This now includes Frequency Seperation of a sort plus the ability to relight the face and improve the eyes, skin and mouth. These can be applied together or independently. For male portraits I tend to just work on the eyes bit for female portraits, it’s not unusual to use all three. This feature, although releatively new but has a lot of potential. At present it does exclude a lot of the functionaly you will find in products such as PortraitPro but nonetheless, it is very usable and the results can be great.It still falls way short of PortraitPro and Affinity in this respect but it’s a good step forward.

The On1 interface is relatively simple to get to grips with with various panels providing information to the left and right of the main editing panel. The left-hand panel can be minimised to provide additional real-estate to allow you to focus on your editing in the centre panel. The right-hand panel contains all the features you need to create amazing post-processed results, often in just a few minutes.

If you need to add layers, ON1 has all of the features you need access to plus as mentioned, you can create a virtual copy at any time to branch into a different editing approach if needed. The results from ON1 are exceptional thanks in part to the ability to use a vast number of presets and LUT’s which take out the heavy lifting and help you create a particual look, for example an analogue film look, black and white images etc etc.

What I like particularly about ON1 is the Effects Panel. This gives you instant access to a number of features including B&W converison, Vignette, Colour and Tone Controls, Contrast Controls and much more. Each these controls in turn have a number of presets you can choose from or, if you prefer, you can edit manually using the sliders. This makes editing RAW files effortless for the most part, especially if you are doing a straight edit.

Another good feature is the ability to create your own presets. For example, recently I wanted to convert some digitised images taken from film negatives so I fully edited one from the batch to exactly how I wanted it, then created a preset which I then applied to the other 35 images in the set. While there was still a need to do some very minor adjustments, for example to exposure because of the changing light conditions, this vastly reduced the amount of effort needed to convert and grade each negative.

The final option availble during editing is Local Adjustments which is basically where you do the your fine tuning of your image. This provides you with a huge range of possibilities including the creation of complex masks. When using local adjustments the tool set on the LHS of the screen has several additional tools that can be used to help in the creation and refining of masks. Depending on the complexity of the object being masked, this process can take anything from a few seconds to a few minutes. The quality of your mask ultimately controls the quality of the resulting images so time taken on mask creation is time well spent.

As mentioned earlier, ON1 allows you to work with images to create composites such a changing a sky on one image for another or adding a texture or background image. Each layer can have it’s own adjustments and effects so it’s possible to create quite complex composite images using this technique. Here, I’ve simply removed the backround of the main portrait and substituted this for a textured background to give more dynamic appeal.

The latest version of On1 Photo Raw 2021 now also works as a plugin to Affinity Photo. When installing On1, if Affinity Photo is loaded on your computer the necessary plugin files are automatically loaded. Plugin files also exist for Adobe Photoshop and again, if On1 locates Photoshop on your PC, it automatically loads the necessary files. Why is this so useful? Well, Affinity Photo is a comparible editor to Photoshop in that it can do pretty much anything that Photoshop can do. The main difference between the two is that Affinity Photo is sold on a perpetual licence, this is currently under £30 (as of 26/03/2021) whereas Adobe Photoshop is sold alongside Adobe Lightroom and Bridge for about £10 per month. That means combining On1 Photo Raw 2021, which I bought for under £50 and Affinity Photo at just £25 equates to an immediate saving of about £45 in the first year. Thereafter, even renewing On1 yearly means more and more savings year on year. Will you notice the difference other than in your pocket? If you are a proficient Photoshop user then probably, there are a lot of presets only available to Photoshop. If you have never used Lightroom or Photoshop, probably not, the functionality of On1 + Affinity Photo matches the Adobe products pretty much feature to feature. I personally have never felt I was losing out by not using Photoshop although there have been times when I have seen 3rd party add-ons that are only available to Photoshop users and I have felt a little disappointed. Then I think how much I have saved and the world’s OK again!

PROS

  • Comprehensive image editing
  • Now works as a plugin to Affinity Photo as well as Photoshop
  • Perpetual licence – buy once and only upgrade if you feel you need to
  • Reasonable cost – often much less than £90 normal price (currently it’s just £58 plus you can often apply vouchers)
  • Relatively quick learning curve
  • Create virtual copies to work on
  • Layer based editing system with the ability to add effects and do local adjustments
  • Portraiture Features
  • A huge number of LUTS and Presets are available to help you create stunning images
  • Comprehensive print and print layout options

CONS

  • Can be slow to load and export images
  • Some lag noticable when masking / adjusting images
  • Mask refinement while good is not perfect
  • Layers are limted to image layers (although you can duplicate layers)
  • UI is busy but well layed out and easy to navigate

ON1: This helpful and complete guide to using ON1 PhotoRaw 2020 is a great reference document for anyone using, or thinking about using ON1 as their primary editor. Find it here.

Nik Analog Efex

Nik Analog Efex

Every so often I get the urge to play with Nik Efex. I can’t help myself, it’s such a fantastic artistic resource for photographers. The above image, not to everyone’s liking I’ll agree, is a simply me throwing a straight image from a photoshoot back in 2019 (which seems an age ago now) and playing with options in Nik Efex. The app I used for this was Nik Analog Efex, a smorgasbord of effects such as film type, lightleaks, motion blur, frames, camera types e.g. toy, classic, vintage etc and a whole lot more. You can simply choose a set of presets e.g. Classic Camera or you can make your own camera kit. If you love to experiment with your images, you’ll get where I am coming from.

The image above uses just a couple of effects built using the Build Your Own Camera option, these being a classic camera, film type and light leaks. No need to over-egg the pudding, I liked the base image and just wanted to add a little interest. Besides, it’s good to keep your hand in with apps like Nik Efex or you forget you have them and more importantly, how to use them.

As I mentioned, this type of experimentation is like marmite, some will love it, some will hate it. It doesn’t much matter which camp you fall into as you’ve read this far so you must be interested! So, if you want to download and play with Nik Efex, you can. It can be had free from the DxO website by visiting https://nikcollection.dxo.com/nik-collection-2012/. Go get it!

Nik Efex | A goldmine of gorgeousness

Nik Efex | A goldmine of gorgeousness

Every so often a piece of software is born that truly excels at what it does. One such gem is Nik Efex. Originally developed by Google as a range of free software applications for various tasks, Nik Efex has now been taken on by camera / lens guru’s DxO. The big change though is that while the Google version was free, the DxO version is part of their DxO stable of advanced editing tools, as well as being available as a paid plugin to Photoshop. However, all is not lost, Google in it’s infinite wisdom made sure that the original version of Nik Efex remains available to those, like me, who are quite happy to use an older stand alone version.

So, how do you get your hands on the free 2012 stand-alone version of Nik Efex. Well, if you search the DxO website you’ll have some trouble finding the link because DxO want you to spend money on all their new goodies. However, to make your life easy, you simply need to visit https://nikcollection.dxo.com/nik-collection-2012/ in order to grab your free for ever copy.

The tasty image above is a Nik Efex worked jpeg from my Nikon D600. In this case I used the gorgeous Nik Analog Efex to create a soft, dreamy look for this mustang with eye popping vintage colours in the background. Taken during a recent photo shoot, Nik Analog Efex makes short work of choosing a particular look for your images that really help make your product stand out from the crowd. Give it a go today, it’s 100% free after all.