Tag: nik analog efex

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Cull or Keep your Images – now that’s the question!

When I first created this post I called it “Don’t be afraid to Cull Bad Images”. However, as the post evolved I felt that I needed to look at keeping versus culling in the round. This article therefore discusses my take on what stays and what goes in my photography.

Now, I’m pretty good at deleting images that say nothing of interest. To me they are obvious to spot, they either suffer from poor composition, a lack of meaningful content, duplicate others that are better or just fail for some technical reason, for example poor focus, blown out highlights or over or under exposed. However, I know that many of my photographer friends struggle with this important process with the result that they fill hard drives at a frightening rate with images that really should be binned. While you may have a dozen SSD disks to play with, I prefer to work light so I rely on just two drives for my archives. As such, drive real-estate is at a premium.

The key here then is to be able to make conscious decisions about what has any real value and what is simply clogging up my drives. This basically means is it good enough to share with others. That might be in the form of a photo book, a project, a competition or even as a give away under Creative Commons. This latter option is something I have recently started to do as I know that bloggers etc often need access to images. If the image fits none of these then the axe needs to fall and fall swiftly. Having said all of this, there is one last check that I do undertake and this to ask the question – does the image have any mitigating features? For example, is there a picture within the picture or does it have merit if converted to art. That has to be done on an image by image basis and for me at least, it’s the last throw of the dice!

Now, the first of these tests is obvious. I will know immediately if I like an image enough to consider it suitable for books, projects or competitions. If you are a club photographer then you will know that this doesn’t necessary mean that someone else will like it, just that I like it sufficiently to use it in one or more of the contexts mentioned.

Starting with The Good

So let’s start with something I do like. This example, from a fairground shoot at the weekend, combines a lot of elements that I like. For example, here we have the juxtaposition of static and dynamic items within the frame, the inclusion of people (one of my favourite subjects) and muted colours rather just B&W. That being said, I really don’t think that this image is going to win any competitions, judges with their strict guidlines just won’t get it, but I can see it in a photobook or perhaps as a future project. It’s also the type of image that could be post-processed in a mirriad of ways so again, it has merit.

Now the Bad

Now let’s take a look at an image, which apart from being shown here, has been discarded. Timing as they say is everything and this image demonstrates a complete lack of timing alongside really poor composition and, I hate to say it, poor technical skills. The content is OK, perhaps a little busy and if I had panned left to include the leading lines of the path along with the fairground items to the left of this ride, then perhaps things might have turned out better. However I didn’t and so alongside the blown out sky, which is unforgiveable, the overly busy composition and poor subject matter really didn’t help this one. RIP. By the way, on the issue of the blown out sky, you might like to take a look at my article on highlight roll-off as this is one way to combat digital burnout from bright lights, sun etc.

Of course, bad photos aren’t limited to tricky locations. You can take a bad photo anywhere – I often do! So let’s look at some more images where to be honest, nothing really works. In the first image below there’s plenty of potential and some technical skill in freezing the water. Sadly though, there’s nothing of interest beyond this but fortunately, I did shoot better on the day. The second image fares pretty much the same, nice but bland and unexceptional and again, I certainly have better in my archives. The seaweed image could perhaps be saved – I often photograph objects – but once again, on that particular day, and from other days I had much better beach dendritus shots. The last two images simply lack good composition even though the subject matter, especially of the first of this pair, has some merit. As they are they though, they are simply fails.

Let’s Finish on a High Note – Some Examples I Enjoy

In this next shot I think I have nailed what makes a good photo. Here, we have an almost perfectly symmetrical image, which the eye loves, great colours, an analogue feel plus movement in the chairs which creates an excitement and a contrast to the perfectly still framework. The other thing I like is that I can dive into this image and take out snippets, for example some the riders on their chairs. It just depends on the resolution of the camera being used and the IQ of the RAW file.

This next image is something that I really liked when I shot it, but was not so happy when I viewed it. The colours really detracted from the subject which is clearly the guy in the middle playing with his mobile phone. I couldn’t however bring myself to delete it, too good for that so I decided to try B&W as a way of removing some of the complexity created by the colours in the shot. My go-to favourite for this type of work is Nik Silver Efex and while I don’t think Nik saves it as a competition photo, it works really well for a photo book or for use on the web. Well, to my mind anyway.

In this next set of images the composition is good, the content is good but it’s not quite working for me. I feel, as I so often do, that the colour is making it difficult to see the story. I am so focused on the bright greens and yellows so as to forget that the piano player is the star of this shot. Again then, B&W, with a little brightening of the face, saves the day by forcing attention on the piano player and away from the bright background. An easy but effective fix.

Earlier I talked about how the seaweed image for me just didn’t work. Well, on the same day I captured that shot, I also captured a few others which I have kept and which form part of my archive. Here are those images for reference. Hopefully you’ll agree that these are somewhat better shots.

A Note On Post-Processing

All of the images shown above, except the B&W versions which were edited in Nik Silver Efex, were created using On1 film presets. I personally love analogue film and when shooting digital, I strive to achive this look both in the SOOC jpegs out of my trusty Fuji x-T1, or by converting the RAW images to something less digital as here. For those seeking to do the same or similar, these images were all post-processed using a Classic Chrome in-camera film simulation that I created for SOOC shots. IN some cases here however I chose to use RAW images passing these through a Classic Chrome preset.

That’s it for now, I hope that you found the meanderings of my mind of interest. Either way, drop me a comment below and let’s create a dialog on how you guys deal with the images you take.

On1 2021 Playing with Layered Images

On1 2021 Playing with Layered Images

I don’t much play with image layers because I find the process a little tedious and time consuming. However, when you’re bored and looking for something to do, why not have a go, it’s all a learning experience after all.

That being said, what this article does not attempt to do is to tell you how to do every fiddly editing task required. What is does do though is cover is the basic process in enough detail so that you have all the information you need to go do it yourself. With these points in mind, let’s get started.

The first thing you are going to need is a bunch of photos. The image above is made up of 4 images taken hand held using a Fuji x-T1 on burst mode. I actually managed to capture around 10 images but layering up all 10 would have made the final image look cluttered and overly busy. I therefore chose just 4 that would give me the feeling of movement that I wanted and that wouldn’t take the rest of my life to process.

Once you have your selected images, you need to create a layered image. To do this simply highlight all of the images you wish to include in your composite – you can do this in BROWSE by pressing Cntrl + Left Mouse Button while hovering over each image (they will then have boxes around them) and then clicking on the Layers icon on the RHS of the screen. This opens a dialog box asking if you want to continue to create a stacked layer image – select OK. On1 takes a little time to do this but of course, this is hardware dependent. Once On1 has done its thing you’ll see a new image with say 4 layers (or as many images as you selected), each layer holding one of the 4 images selected. The bottom layer in the stack is going to be the base layer that contains all of the information in the photo ie the people, wall, background, everything. You are not really going to do anything to this layer unless you want to develop it or change the style. If you need to change the order of the images you can simply drag and drop them into their new locations. Bear in mind though that the lowest layer in the list is your base layer, everything else is composited onto that layer.

With regards pre-editing each image, personally I tend to leave any post-processing until the end of the process. I also tend to work on RAW so as to include as much information in the final image as possible.

When starting to work on a particular layer you need to isolate this. You do this by clicking on the small orange dot to the LHS of the small image in the layers panel that you want to turn off. When the layer is active, the dot is orange. When off, it’s grey. Once these are off, you are left with just the layer you want to work on.

The key tool to use now, and this is repeated for the other 2 layers, is the MASK tool on the LHS of the screen. Click on this and choose AI from the list of 3 icons top left of the editing screen. Make sure that MODE: KEEP is on and you are ready to start painting. With MODE: KEEP on, everything you paint over is in green. Now, you really don’t need to be ultra precise at this point so just run the brush (which you can change in size) top to bottom and left to right of the guy in the air. Then, with MODE:DROP enabled, run your pointer (it’s now turned to red) around the image pretty much as shown here to mark all of the parts you don’t want to keep. Now, I tend to use a drawing pad for this but you can just use your mouse if you don’t have one. Either way, here’s what it’s going to look like before you hit APPLY.

Once you hit apply, this is what you are going to see (hopefully). Basically the red areas are transparent which of course is exactly what you want for layering up a complex image.

The next step is to refine the edges of your green selection so that any parts you don’t want to include are dropped. For this operation you simple use the REFINE tool on the LHS making sure that you set MODE: DROP. There are several tool options but I use mostly the REFINE and CHISEL brushes as these clean up the image pretty well. You need to take your time but you can do a great job with care and patience. Here, I spent just a few minutes on the cleanup process but you can see that the end result looks pretty good.

That’s it for this image, you simply repeat this process for the other 2 layers and you’re ready to compile them into the final composite. You do this by turning all the layers ON (orange dot is showing) and then setting the OPACITY for each layer so that the layer below bleeds through. Because I wanted the effect of motion, I set the very top layer to about 20%, the next to 35% and the 3rd to 50% initially and then modified them slightly to get the effect I wanted. You can play with these faders as it’s all a matter of taste. Once you are happy with your composite, highlight the very top image and go to export. This will ensure that all 4 layers are exported to the final composite image. Here’s the resulting 4 image composite I ended up with.

You can of course stop here but I tend to like to stylise my images using Nik Efex so the very first image (header image) used Nik Silver Efex while the one shown below used Nik Alanog Efex. I hope that this has given you a few ideas for playing around with layers.

Shot of the Day | 5th April

Shot of the Day | 5th April

If you know me you’ll have most recently seen me walking around clutching an old film camera loaded with B&W film. I’ve enjoyed playing with film and in particular, developing my negatives. Today though I opted to go back to my beloved Fuji x-t1 which for some time now has been my go to digital camera. This displaced my equally beloved Lumix GX80 about 6 months ago, even though that camera is truly amazing. In truth, there’s very little to differentiate between the two when comparing RAW images but once you start looking at jpeg emulations SOOC, the Fuji wins hands down. Since the need to edit is something I’d like to reduce, getting usable jpegs SOOC is a key aim and while the Fuji x-t1 lacks some of the controls of later models, it does create a very usable start point if not a perfectly acceptable image in itself.

One of the great places to film that I have recently found is the skate park in Victoria Park, Paignton which appears generally to be full of lads (and men) having a whale of a time on bikes, boards and laterly, scooters. Importantly, they all seem to welcome the attention of this particular photographer so I’ve had no problem capturing some great shots of the guys in action.

While the start point for the image above was a jpeg from the Fuji, in this instance I decided to edit in Nik Analog Efex to give a truer 60’s feel to the colours and tones. The image from the Fuji x-t1, while really good in itself, just can’t seem to get as close to a real analog feel and look as I’d like.

Nik Analog Efex

Nik Analog Efex

Every so often I get the urge to play with Nik Efex. I can’t help myself, it’s such a fantastic artistic resource for photographers. The above image, not to everyone’s liking I’ll agree, is a simply me throwing a straight image from a photoshoot back in 2019 (which seems an age ago now) and playing with options in Nik Efex. The app I used for this was Nik Analog Efex, a smorgasbord of effects such as film type, lightleaks, motion blur, frames, camera types e.g. toy, classic, vintage etc and a whole lot more. You can simply choose a set of presets e.g. Classic Camera or you can make your own camera kit. If you love to experiment with your images, you’ll get where I am coming from.

The image above uses just a couple of effects built using the Build Your Own Camera option, these being a classic camera, film type and light leaks. No need to over-egg the pudding, I liked the base image and just wanted to add a little interest. Besides, it’s good to keep your hand in with apps like Nik Efex or you forget you have them and more importantly, how to use them.

As I mentioned, this type of experimentation is like marmite, some will love it, some will hate it. It doesn’t much matter which camp you fall into as you’ve read this far so you must be interested! So, if you want to download and play with Nik Efex, you can. It can be had free from the DxO website by visiting https://nikcollection.dxo.com/nik-collection-2012/. Go get it!

Nik Efex | A goldmine of gorgeousness

Nik Efex | A goldmine of gorgeousness

Every so often a piece of software is born that truly excels at what it does. One such gem is Nik Efex. Originally developed by Google as a range of free software applications for various tasks, Nik Efex has now been taken on by camera / lens guru’s DxO. The big change though is that while the Google version was free, the DxO version is part of their DxO stable of advanced editing tools, as well as being available as a paid plugin to Photoshop. However, all is not lost, Google in it’s infinite wisdom made sure that the original version of Nik Efex remains available to those, like me, who are quite happy to use an older stand alone version.

So, how do you get your hands on the free 2012 stand-alone version of Nik Efex. Well, if you search the DxO website you’ll have some trouble finding the link because DxO want you to spend money on all their new goodies. However, to make your life easy, you simply need to visit https://nikcollection.dxo.com/nik-collection-2012/ in order to grab your free for ever copy.

The tasty image above is a Nik Efex worked jpeg from my Nikon D600. In this case I used the gorgeous Nik Analog Efex to create a soft, dreamy look for this mustang with eye popping vintage colours in the background. Taken during a recent photo shoot, Nik Analog Efex makes short work of choosing a particular look for your images that really help make your product stand out from the crowd. Give it a go today, it’s 100% free after all.